Category Archives: Faith Transition

Why We Can’t Leave it Alone

“You Leave But You Can’t Leave it Alone”

That is the criticism every non-silent former Mormon (or other religious tribe where this is a common issue) hears from still-member friends and all the way up the the leaders of the Church.

This is why people can “leave the Church, but not leave it alone” and “tear apart their family” in the process.

(No doctrine, history, or “anti” info here. Just an analogy to answer the question.)

I know its hard for those who believe to be left by those they love and to feel attacked. I was one of them. I know exactly how that feels, both in times when truly hurts and times when you easily “let go and let God.” I know how it feels to trust God and love them anyway.

…Love, but not truly hear…

The Family’s Favorite Uncle

It’s always the person willing to expose the family’s favorite uncle for abuse he’s committed, who gets blamed for tearing the family apart, rather than the uncle who actually committed those crimes.

Why?

In many cases it’s because the other family members can’t fathom the accusations are true. Even if there is proof—they already KNOW he’s wonderful, no matter what evidence there is to the contrary (including evidence actually admitted by HIM).

Or because they value not rocking the boat more than they value the truth, in spite of the accounts of those who have been hurt by him. Rocking the boat directly affects them because it is negative and feels horrible.

Or because of the great good he also does in the world.

Or maybe they feel he “got better,” thus don’t feel its important everyone knows about it, even in order to be informed and aware for the safety of their children, just in case.

Or they have seen some of the evidence but feel his rebuttal debunked it to their satisfaction.

Or they heard some of the accounts of abuse and felt forced to believe the victim was lying, or that it didn’t matter as much as the greater unity of the family, or that the victim somehow caused the incident, or other discounting views of the victim’s experience.

Or any number of other reasons.

Tragically, the one who was willing to step out of the family’s/tribe’s status quo to raise awareness about the harm, is the one who gets the heat.

Now, you may feel this analogy does not apply—you may feel it is false accusation, and for this discussion that is okay! We are not getting into the proof or debate on that.

All I ask is that you try to understand that many others you love feel it does apply, and thus it warrants compassion at the very least (how would you feel being the one having knowledge of the favorite uncle’s abusive behavior?), or even better, open listening and honest understanding.

Does this Change Anything?

Considering this analogy, do you feel there is a way to now mend the bridge over the pain between the two perspectives?

Why or why not?

Under what terms?

Empowerment Living and Faith Transition

Introduction to Commonalities Between Empowerment and Faith Transition

I have wondered whether I’d ever broach “faith transition” in conjunction with Empowerment Coaching, and the more I’ve shared about it on my personal Facebook Profile over the last year, the more I realize how it fits with the needs of many in our community here.

This is my first post on this topic on my Empowerment Blog, and I will import and add more here under a new category dedicated to experiences around “Faith Transition.”

There are so many joyful and challenging commonalities between the various aspects of a “faith crisis” or “faith transition” experience and personal development for empowerment!

Among them:

  • Living your authentic self
  • Recognizing your divine nature and worth with ZERO caveats
  • Dealing with criticisms of loved ones who don’t understand or can’t fathom what you’ve discovered or why you take the path you are on
  • Breaking out of the mold of the standard “middle/working class” mindset in favor of greater joy and abundance, and breaking out of the family and/or religious mold also in favor of greater joy and abundance
  • Leaving your tribe, your known world and community for the unknown
  • Embracing unrestricted access to all the Universe has for you

I’ve had many meaningful spiritual experiences and transformational breakthroughs in my life, and by far my faith crisis and subsequent transition has become the single most significant (traumatic, joyful, and important) event of my life.

If you’ve been through a faith transition, posts in this category will hopefully serve as support from someone who knows how traumatic having your entire world flipped upside-down in this way can be.

If you haven’t but know someone who has, I hope these will serve as a basis for understanding and thoughtful discussion.

Varied Beliefs Between Coach and Client

No matter what religious or other “package” you put around High Truth/Universal Laws, the Laws remain and are compatible with any belief system. I have experienced them as a firm believer in my former religion, and as a post-believer, and I’ve found they function the same.

Empowerment Coaching with me has no bearing on what religion, spirituality, or atheism you and I personally ascribe to, and as long as we both fully realize that, we can work together in utmost respect.

As always, the ultimate goal is for personal empowerment, whereby we can live our most fabulous lives and influence the world to do the same!